FAQ Graphology Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions related to graphology and handwriting analysis.

What is graphology?

Graphology is the art of reading character from handwriting. Source Graphology or How to read Character from Handwriting by Simmon Arke American Institute of Graphology 1903.

MERRIAM-WEBSTER DICTIONARIES Definition of graphology : the study of handwriting especially for the purpose of character analysis.

Is graphology art or science?

Short Answer - Graphology is a science, an empirical science. The art is in handwriting analysis where artful skills are required for expression and communication.

Wikipedia defines Science: is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.

Wikipedia describes graphology as pseudoscience.

Any quick test to prove graphology?

How many persons are there who are able to answer off-hand the following questions regarding their own chirography?

Do you close your a's and o's at the top or leave them open?
Do you end the final letter of a word abruptly, or do you add a final stroke?
If you use terminal strokes to your final letters, do these strokes ascend, descend or extend in a straight line?
Do the letters of a word remain uniform in size throughout the word or do they diminish or increase toward the end of the word?

Unless a person has made it a point to analyze his writing, there is not one in a thousand who is able to answer the foregoing questions. In order to do -so he will be obliged first to examine some of his own writing. And these are but a few of a score of questions that might be asked in reference to the characteristics of handwriting about which the average person is entirely ignorant. This goes to show very plainly that many of the constituent features of a handwriting have been unconsciously adopted, and although they may appear insignificant in themselves they are nevertheless all very significant as indications of the writer's personality and are some of the most important guides in the reading of the character. Unless, as just stated, a person has made it a point to study his penmanship, he knows really very little about it beyond its general appearance.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

Do different pen change handwriting?

There are some who believe that difference in handwritings is largely due to the difference in styles of pens. It is true that pens have much to do with the appearance of the handwriting, but the choice of a pen is one of the elements involved in the individuality of handwriting. Each one of us chooses a style of pen that best suits them, and hence it allows them to write in the manner that is most natural to them. But it is a mistake to suppose that it is the pen that determines the peculiarities of a handwriting. It may be awkward for a person who is accustomed to a stub pen to use a fine-pointed pen, but it will not alter the distinguishing characteristics of his handwriting any more than it destroys his personality to wear a suit of clothes that does not fit him.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

Handwriting changes over a period of time so...

Of course, the style of handwriting does not in every case remain the same throughout the entire life of a man or woman. A person at fifty may not write the same hand that he did when he was eighteen or twenty, and if he lives to be eighty or ninety it will in all probability show further indications of change. This fact only emphasizes the relationship between handwriting and personality; for it will always be found that where there is a change in the style of penmanship there is a corresponding change in the person himself. Very few of us retain the same character, disposition and nature that we had in youth. Experience and vicissitudes do much to modify our natures, and with such modifications come alterations in our handwriting. In some persons, the change is very slight, while in others it is noticeably evident.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

Is there a connection between handwriting and personality?

When we receive a letter from a friend it is not necessary to open it in order to know from whom it comes. A glance at the address on the envelope is sufficient. The style of the handwriting tells us at once who the writer is. We recognize him by his penmanship as readily as we would by his voice.

This shows us very convincingly that there must be some sort of relationship between the style of handwriting and the personality of the writer.
Another familiar evidence of this is the fact that no two persons write exactly alike, notwithstanding that hundreds of thousands of us learned to write from the same copybooks and were taught to form our letters in precisely the same way.

Now, if handwriting bore no relationship to personality and was not influenced by the character of the individual, we would all be writing the beautiful Spencerian copperplate we were taught in our school days. But, as it is, not one in fifty thousand writes in this manner five years after leaving school.

Each one of us has modified the copybook style in accordance with his individual character. Each one has unconsciously adopted a style of handwriting that is best suited to his tastes and inclinations and has consequently given to it a distinctive character.

Like speech or gesture, handwriting serves as a means for the expression of thought; and in expressing our thoughts we give expression to ourselves.

When once the art of writing is learned we are no longer conscious of the mental and manual effort required to form the letters. It becomes as it were a second nature to us. We do it mechanically, just as we form our words when talking, without realizing the complex processes of mind and muscle that it involves.

It is plain, therefore, that a person's handwriting, or chirography, is really a part of himself. It is an expression of his personality and is as characteristic of him as is his gait or his tone of voice.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

What all is seen using graphology?

Character traits are seen in using graphology. Click here to see a long list.

You need an active membership with GGA Global Graphologists Association to see all the possible handwriting formations related to that personality trait.

What are the uses or applications of graphology?

What are the uses of graphology. What are the applications of handwriting analysis.

The use of graphology extends to understanding health issues, morality, past experiences, hidden talents, and mental problems. Source: Personality Profile Through Handwriting Analysis D. John Antony, O.F.M.Cap.

 

What changes our handwriting?

Each one of us has modified the copybook style in accordance with his individual character. Each one has unconsciously adopted a style of handwriting that is best suited to his tastes and inclinations and has consequently given to it a distinctive character.

Now, if handwriting bore no relationship to personality and was not influenced by the character of the individual, we would all be writing the beautiful Spencerian copperplate we were taught in our school days. But, as it is, not one in fifty thousand writes in this manner five years after leaving school.

Without pursuing the subject farther it must be evident to every thoughtful mind that handwriting does bear a very close and definite relationship to the personality of the writer. We see that everyone has a style of chirography peculiar to himself, and it is only reasonable to suppose that each feature of his writing reflects some personal trait or tendency; otherwise, why is there such a variety of features in handwritings? What would cause these various distinguishing characteristics of penmanship if it is not the individuality of the writers themselves?

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

What if handwriting is changed deliberately?

When a man attempts to change his style of handwriting he simply alters the principal features of it. If his writing normally slopes to the right, he will probably adopt a backhand. He may also use a different kind of pen; may change the size of the writing, alter the customary formation of certain letters, and add certain unfamiliar flourishes. But knowing nothing about the many minor characteristics of his natural writing he unconsciously repeats them, notwithstanding his best efforts to veil the identity of his chirography. In this respect, he resembles the actor, who, while he may assume all the outward characteristics of another individual, still retains certain personal peculiarities of which he is himself unaware and which render it impossible for him to completely disguise his own individuality.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903

What if my handwriting keeps changing?

There are also many who claim that their writing is changeable; that they never write twice alike. This is true to a certain limited extent.

Probably no one can produce three specimens of his own signature that are absolute facsimiles. But the differences are purely superficial.
The style of handwriting varies no more from day to day than does the outward appearance of the individual. A change of emotion will produce a corresponding change in the expression of the face. A different style of hat, a change in the mode of wearing the hair, the shaving off of a beard or any alteration of a like character will produce its effect, but the individuality of the person is not affected thereby. In a similar manner, our penmanship is superficially modified by our feelings, our physical condition, by the kind of ink we use, the style of pen, the kind of paper, etc., but its individuality remains unaltered.

Source: Graphology or How to Read Character from Handwriting BY SIMON ARKE American Institute of Graphology 305 Lenman Building Washington, D. C. 1903